October 18, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Israeli Foreign Minister and Alternate Prime Minister Lapid

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary Blinken met today with Israeli Foreign Minister and Alternate Prime Minister Yair Lapid, whom he welcomed to Washington for the Minister’s first official visit.  The Secretary and the Foreign Minister discussed a range of issues, including Iran, Syria, and the People’s Republic of China.  Secretary Blinken and the Minister also discussed opportunities to enhance regional normalization efforts as well as energy and economic cooperation.  The Secretary reiterated the Administration’s support for measures that enhance the prospects for a two-state solution and tangibly improve the lives of Palestinians and Israelis.  The Secretary also underscored the ironclad U.S. commitment to Israel’s security. 

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