Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Indian External Affairs Minister Jaishankar

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken welcomed Indian External Affairs Minister Dr. S. Jaishankar to the Department of State, where he reaffirmed the Administration’s commitment to deepening the U.S.-India Comprehensive Global Strategic Partnership. Secretary Blinken and Minister Jaishankar discussed a broad range of issues, including COVID-19 relief, efforts to strengthen Indo-Pacific cooperation through the Quad, and a shared commitment to combating the climate crisis and enhancing multilateral cooperation, including at the UN Security Council. Secretary Blinken and Minister Jaishankar also discussed regional developments, the coup in Burma, and continuing support for Afghanistan.  Secretary Blinken and Minister Jaishankar pledged to continue their cooperation on shared economic and regional security priorities.

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    A Somerset County, New Jersey, man admitted today that he concealed his attempts to provide material support to Hamas, Assistant Attorney General John C. Demers of the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division, U.S. Attorney Craig Carpenito, FBI-Newark Special Agent in Charge George M. Crouch Jr., and FBI Assistant Director for Counterterrorism Jill Sanborn announced.
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  • Austria Travel Advisory
    In Travel
    Reconsider travel to [Read More…]
  • Local man sentenced for smuggling 35 people in hot trailer
    In Justice News
    A 52-year-old Laredo [Read More…]
  • U.S. Trustee Program Reaches Agreements with Three Mortgage Servicers Providing More than $74 Million in Remediation to Homeowners in Bankruptcy
    In Crime News
    The Department of Justice’s U.S. Trustee Program (USTP announced today that it has entered into national agreements with three mortgage servicers to address past mortgage servicing deficiencies impacting homeowners in bankruptcy.
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  • Pride Month
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Department of Justice Issues Positive Business Review Letter to Companies Developing Plasma Therapies for Covid-19
    In Crime News
    The Department of Justice announced today that it has no intention to challenge proposed efforts by Baxalta US Inc., Emergent BioSolutions Inc., Grifols Therapeutics LLC, and CSL Plasma Inc. (together, the “Requesting Parties”) to assist the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) in designing quality standards for collecting COVID-19 convalescent plasma.
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  • Attorney General Merrick B. Garland Delivers Remarks at Announcement of Pattern or Practice Investigation into the Minneapolis Police Department
    In Crime News
    Good morning.  Like so many of you, I have closely watched the events in Minnesota. Although the state’s prosecution was successful, I know that nothing can fill the void that the loved ones of George Floyd have felt since his death. My heart goes out to them and to all those who have experienced similar loss. 
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  • Brazilian Partnership to Begin Producing NASA-Designed COVID-19 Ventilator
    In Space
    The Brazilian Health [Read More…]
  • Justice Department Requires Substantial Divestitures in Zen-Noh Acquisition of Grain Elevators from Bunge to Protect American Farmers
    In Crime News
    The Department of Justice announced today that it will require Zen-Noh Grain Corp. (ZGC) to divest nine grain elevators in nine geographic areas located in five states along the Mississippi River and its tributaries in order to proceed with its proposed $300 million acquisition of 35 operating and 13 idled grain elevators from Bunge North America Inc. 
    [Read More…]