October 18, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Egyptian Foreign Minister Shoukry

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met with Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry today in New York City on the margins of the UN General Assembly.  Secretary Blinken and Foreign Minister Shoukry discussed regional issues, including Israeli-Palestinian relations, diplomatic efforts on Libya, Egypt’s leadership in founding the Eastern Mediterranean Gas Forum, and our mutual desire for results-oriented negotiations on the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam under the auspices of the African Union. They discussed the high value both the United States and Egypt place on strengthening and deepening our partnership that is responsive to the full range of issues in the bilateral relationship.  The Secretary noted that such a strengthened partnership would be facilitated by steps from the Government of Egypt to improve its protection of human rights, including by implementing measures in the National Strategy on Human Rights launched by the Egyptian government last week.  Secretary Blinken and Foreign Minister Shoukry agreed to hold a bilateral strategic dialogue to discuss regional issues, human rights, security cooperation, and economic relations.

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