September 28, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Calls with Israeli Foreign Minister Ashkenazi

13 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Israeli Foreign Minister Gabi Ashkenazi this morning and again in the afternoon. During their afternoon conversation, the Secretary welcomed the Foreign Minister’s confirmation that the parties had agreed to a ceasefire. Both leaders expressed their appreciation for Egypt’s mediation efforts, and the Secretary noted that he would continue to remain in close touch with his Egyptian counterpart and other regional stakeholders. The Foreign Minister welcomed Secretary Blinken’s planned travel to the region, where the Secretary will meet with Israeli, Palestinian, and regional counterparts in the coming days to discuss recovery efforts and working together to build better futures for Israelis and Palestinians.

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