Secretary Blinken’s Call with United Nations Secretary-General Guterres

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres yesterday to discuss Afghanistan, Ethiopia, and Burma.  On Afghanistan, Secretary Blinken thanked Secretary-General Guterres for his commitment to helping advance talks on a just and durable political settlement and permanent and comprehensive ceasefire.  Secretary Blinken called for enhanced regional and international efforts to help resolve the humanitarian crisis, end atrocities, and restore peace in Ethiopia.  They also discussed the importance of an independent, international and credible investigation into reported human rights abuses and violations in Tigray.  On Burma, Secretary Blinken underscored the importance of continued unity at the United Nations to prevent further violence and urge the restoration of Burma’s democratically-elected government.  They agreed to remain in close touch on these and other pressing matters.

 

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