October 21, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with the United Arab Emirates Foreign Minister Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with United Arab Emirates Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan.  The Secretary and Foreign Minister discussed efforts to bring the current violence in Israel and the West Bank and Gaza to an end and halt the tragic loss of civilian life.  The Secretary highlighted the importance of the UAE’s contributions towards promoting a more peaceful Middle East.

 

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