Secretary Blinken’s Call with Special Envoy for the UN Secretary-General on Yemen Griffiths

Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

In an introductory call with Special Envoy Martin Griffiths on March 14, the Secretary expressed U.S. concern regarding the conflict in Yemen, particularly the humanitarian toll on the Yemeni people. He highlighted that the United States supports a unified, stable Yemen free from foreign influence, and that there is no military solution to the conflict.

The Secretary underscored that the United States’ efforts under Special Envoy Lenderking intend to reinvigorate diplomatic efforts, alongside the UN and others, to end the war in Yemen. The Secretary also expressed U.S. support for the UN Special Envoy’s efforts to bring all parties to consensus.

The Secretary conveyed his willingness to collaborate closely with Special Envoy Griffiths and the UN.

 

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    Acting United States Attorney General Monty Wilkinson, FBI Director Christopher Wray and President Joe Biden’s Homeland Security Advisor Dr. Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall led a United States Government delegation to Fort Lauderdale, Florida today that attended the funeral service for fallen FBI Special Agent Laura Schwartzenberger. 
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  • Request for Statements of Interest: FY20 China Programs
    In Human Health, Resources and Services
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  • Secretary Pompeo’s Meeting with French President Macron
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • The United States Targets Foundations Controlled by Iran’s Supreme Leader
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]
  • U.S.-Europe Communiqué on Afghanistan and Peace Efforts
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • New Caledonia Travel Advisory
    In Travel
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  • Department of Justice Files Nationwide Lawsuit Against Walmart Inc. for Controlled Substances Act Violations
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  • Man “traveling for work” sentenced for smuggling 23 kilos of meth
    In Justice News
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  • Priority Open Recommendations: Nuclear Regulatory Commission
    In U.S GAO News
    What GAO Found In April 2020, GAO identified seven priority recommendations for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Since then, NRC implemented one of these recommendations by issuing a risk management strategy that addresses key elements foundational to effectively managing cybersecurity risks. The remaining six priority recommendations involve the following areas: addressing the security of radiological sources. improving the reliability of cost estimates. improving strategic human capital management. NRC's continued attention to these issues could lead to significant improvements in government operations. Why GAO Did This Study Priority open recommendations are the GAO recommendations that warrant priority attention from heads of key departments or agencies because their implementation could save large amounts of money; improve congressional and/or executive branch decision-making on major issues; eliminate mismanagement, fraud, and abuse; or ensure that programs comply with laws and funds are legally spent, among other benefits. Since 2015, GAO has sent letters to selected agencies to highlight the importance of implementing such recommendations. For more information, contact Mark Gaffigan at (202) 512-3841 or gaffiganm@gao.gov.
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  • Colorado Man Sentenced for Sexual Exploitation of Children in Guatemala
    In Crime News
    A Colorado man was sentenced today to 60 years in prison for production, transportation, and possession of child pornography.
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  • Judiciary Releases Annual Report and Judicial Business 2020
    In U.S Courts
    Along with the rest of America, the Judiciary confronted significant challenges in 2020, led by the need to meet its constitutional obligations amid a deadly global pandemic. Federal courts learned to keep operations going, despite restricted access to courth­ouses, with a quickly evolving reliance on technology and the resilience of a 30,000-strong workforce, according to the Annual Report of the Director Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts (AO).
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  • Secretary Antony J. Blinken With Andrea Mitchell of MSNBC Andrea Mitchell Reports
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • Wife of “El Chapo” Arrested on International Drug Trafficking Charges
    In Crime News
    The wife of Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman Loera, leader of a Mexican drug trafficking organization known as the Sinaloa Cartel, was arrested today in Virginia on charges related to her alleged involvement in international drug trafficking.
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  • On Intra Afghan Negotiations and the Road to Peace
    In Crime News
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  • On the UN Human Rights Council’s Embrace of Authoritarian Regimes
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • Secretary Antony J. Blinken With Rene Pfister of Der Spiegel
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • The United States Partners with Australia and Japan to Expand Reliable and Secure Digital Connectivity in Palau
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • Wrongful billing results in $2.6M settlement and 10-year exclusion from federal health care programs
    In Justice News
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  • North Carolina Return Preparer Pleads Guilty to Tax Fraud Scheme
    In Crime News
    A North Carolina return preparer pleaded guilty today to conspiring to defraud the United States.
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  • DOJ and HHS Issue Guidance on ‘Long COVID’ and Disability Rights Under the ADA, Section 504, and Section 1557
    In Crime News
    Today, as we commemorate the 31st anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) are jointly publishing guidance on how “long COVID” can be a disability under the ADA, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act. The guidance is on the DOJ website at https://www.ada.gov/long_covid_joint_guidance.pdf - PDF and on the HHS website at https://www.hhs.gov/civil-rights/for-providers/civil-rights-covid19/index.html.
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