September 27, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Spanish Foreign Minister González Laya

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Spanish Foreign Minister Arancha González Laya today to discuss ways to strengthen the bilateral and Transatlantic relationships.  The Secretary thanked Spain for hosting U.S. forces and emphasized the U.S. desire to work with Spain, the EU, and other partners to address shared challenges, including COVID-19 and advancing future pandemic preparedness, climate change, Russia, China, and Venezuela.

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