September 22, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Spanish Foreign Minister Albares

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Spanish Foreign Minister José Manuel Albares today.  Secretary Blinken thanked Foreign Minister Albares for Spain’s continued assistance with the evacuation and transit of vulnerable individuals from Afghanistan, and the two discussed plans for future diplomatic engagement and humanitarian assistance in Afghanistan.

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