October 18, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Russian Foreign Minister Lavrov

10 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov about developments in Afghanistan, including the security situation and our efforts to bring U.S. citizens and vulnerable Afghans to safety.

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