Secretary Blinken’s Call with Republic of Cyprus Foreign Minister Christodoulides

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with Republic of Cyprus (ROC) Foreign Minister Nikos Christodoulides.  Secretary Blinken and Foreign Minister Christodoulides reaffirmed their mutual commitment to deepening the strong U.S.-ROC bilateral relationship.  The Secretary and the Foreign Minister agreed on the importance of promoting stability in the Eastern Mediterranean through regional cooperation and peaceful resolution of disagreements.  The Secretary pledged continued U.S. support for Cypriot-led, UN-facilitated efforts to reunify the island as a bizonal, bicommunal federation for the benefit of all Cypriots, as the United States encourages both sides to demonstrate the necessary openness, flexibility, and compromise to find common ground to restart Cyprus settlement talks.  The Secretary expressed support for the 3+1 diplomatic mechanism, which includes the ROC, Greece, Israel, and the United States.   The Secretary stressed the importance of efforts to counter harmful influence from Russia and China in the region.

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    Epsilon Data Management LLC (Epsilon), one of the largest marketing companies in the world, has entered into a settlement with the Department of Justice to resolve a criminal charge for selling millions of Americans’ information to perpetrators of elder fraud schemes.
    [Read More…]
  • Owner of Seafood Processor Sentenced to Prison for Tax Evasion
    In Crime News
    A Rhode Island man was sentenced to three years in prison today for tax evasion, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division, U.S. Attorney Aaron L. Weisman for the District of Rhode Island, and Special Agent in Charge Kristina O’Connell of IRS Criminal Investigation.
    [Read More…]
  • Secretary Antony J. Blinken with Palestinian Civil Society Leaders
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Department Press Briefing – February 25, 2021
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Ned Price, Department [Read More…]
  • Detention of Armenian Soldiers
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Ned Price, Department [Read More…]