October 18, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Qatari Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Al-Thani 

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with Qatari Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al-Thani and thanked him for Qatar’s tremendous effort to help with the safe transit of U.S. citizens, Afghans, and other evacuees from Afghanistan.  Secretary Blinken commended Qatar for our strong partnership to promote regional security and discussed other important bilateral efforts to advance U.S.-Qatar ties.

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