September 22, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Nepali Prime Minister Deuba

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Nepali Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba today.  Secretary Blinken and Prime Minister Deuba emphasized the importance of the U.S.-Nepal partnership and discussed the recent U.S. donation of 1.5 million vaccines and other COVID-19 assistance to Nepal.  The Secretary and the Prime Minister also discussed our cooperation to combat the effects of climate change.

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