September 27, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with NATO Secretary General Stoltenberg

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg to underscore the Biden Administration’s determination to strengthen and reinvigorate the Transatlantic Alliance. Secretary Blinken and the Secretary General also discussed the NATO 2030 report, which provides a solid foundation for NATO’s adaption to new strategic realities. In addition, they agreed to begin talks to schedule a NATO Summit/Leaders’ Meeting in the first half of 2021.

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