October 19, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Mexican Foreign Secretary Ebrard  

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Mexican Foreign Secretary Marcelo Ebrard about coordination to manage the flows of irregular migrants.  The United States and Mexico share a common goal of promoting safe, orderly, and humane migration, and discussed ways to address the challenges of irregular migration.  Secretary Blinken shared his concerns about the dangers of irregular migration, which puts individuals at great risk and often requires migrants and their families to incur crippling debt.  The two also discussed the need for a coordinated regional effort to stem the flow of irregular migration.

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