September 22, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Kosovo Prime Minister Kurti

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Kosovo Prime Minister Albin Kurti today to thank Kosovo for its early and generous agreement to temporarily host at-risk individuals from Afghanistan.  Kosovo’s steadfast humanitarian support during this transition is a testament to its willingness and capacity to contribute to global peace and security.  Secretary Blinken and Prime Minister Kurti noted the longstanding partnership between the United States and Kosovo and reiterated their commitment to closely coordinate on shared priorities.

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