October 21, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Iraqi Prime Minister al-Kadhimi

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Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi today.  The Secretary conveyed his outrage at the multiple rocket attacks yesterday in Erbil and sent his condolences to the innocent Iraqi civilians who were injured as well as to the Coalition members injured and the family and loved ones of the civilian contractor killed in the attack.  The Secretary discussed his call with Kurdistan Regional Government Prime Minister Masrour Barzani and encouraged Prime Minister Kadhimi to continue to work closely with the regional government to address violent extremists.  They discussed efforts underway to identify and hold accountable the groups responsible for yesterday’s attacks, as well as the Iraqi government’s responsibility and commitment to protect U.S. and Coalition personnel in Iraq at the government’s invitation to fight ISIS.

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