Secretary Blinken’s Call with Guatemalan Foreign Minister Brolo

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Guatemalan Foreign Minister Pedro Brolo today.  Secretary Blinken noted that the United States values our partnership with Guatemala and we are closely following the recent challenges to anti-corruption efforts in Guatemala.  The U.S. government continues to work closely with the Public Ministry and the Special Prosecutor’s Office Against Impunity (FECI) to support anti-corruption efforts.  The Secretary expressed deep concern about any efforts to abolish anti-corruption offices, such as FECI, and relayed that the preservation of independent institutions that fight corruption and impunity is fundamental to addressing challenges to security, prosperity, and governance in Guatemala.

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