October 26, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Ghanaian Foreign Minister Botchwey

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with Ghanaian Foreign Minister Shirley Ayorkor Botchwey.  Secretary Blinken and Foreign Minister Botchwey emphasized the importance of our partnership to security, health, and democratic development in Ghana and the West African region.  The Secretary reiterated our commitment to promoting economic growth and prosperity for all Ghanaians.

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