September 22, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Danish Foreign Minister Kofod 

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price: 

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with Danish Foreign Minister Jeppe Kofod.  The Secretary thanked the Foreign Minister and the people of the Kingdom of Denmark for their extraordinary partnership and sacrifices in the NATO Resolute Support Mission in Afghanistan.  The Secretary also expressed gratitude for Denmark’s current contributions to the evacuation of U.S. citizens, our allies, and vulnerable Afghan citizens.

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