Secretary Blinken’s Call with Czech Prime Minister Babiš

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babiš today.  Secretary Blinken emphasized the U.S. commitment to the Transatlantic Alliance, U.S.-EU partnership, the common fight against malign influence, and the importance of continued military modernization and robust defense spending by NATO Allies.  Secretary Blinken and Prime Minister Babiš discussed our shared commitment to overcome and recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.  Secretary Blinken highlighted the need to secure critical infrastructure, including Czech nuclear energy and 5G networks, from untrusted actors and the importance of the Three Seas Initiative to strengthening regional economic resilience.  Secretary Blinken thanked Prime Minister Babiš for the Czech Republic’s service as our Protecting Power in Syria and for continued support in Afghanistan and Iraq.

 

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