October 19, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Colombian Vice President and Foreign Minister Ramirez

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with Colombian Vice President and Foreign Minister Marta Lucia Ramirez.  The Secretary reaffirmed the enduring partnership between our two countries.  He emphasized the importance of defending and advancing democracy in the region, particularly in Haiti, Nicaragua, Venezuela, and Cuba.  He reiterated our gratitude to the Government of Colombia for its model outreach to the Venezuelan migrant population.  He expressed U.S. support for Colombia’s COVID-19 pandemic recovery, as underscored by our recent donation of 2.5 million doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine and 3.5 million doses of the Moderna vaccine to Colombia.  He emphasized our shared commitment to expanding citizen security in the region, meeting our joint counter-narcotics goals, and listening to citizens’ concerns and addressing the root causes of recent protests.  He affirmed our support for lasting peace in Colombia and inclusive economic growth as our hemisphere recovers.

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