October 26, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Azerbaijani President Aliyev

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev today.  Secretary Blinken and President Aliyev emphasized the continuing importance of the U.S.-Azerbaijan bilateral partnership, and discussed a range of issues.  The Secretary underscored the importance of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. The Secretary noted the importance of continuing efforts by the OSCE Minsk Group Co-Chairs to negotiate a lasting political settlement to the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict benefiting all people in the region.

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