Secretary Blinken’s Call with Afghanistan High Council for National Reconciliation Chair Dr. Abdullah

Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with the Chairman of Afghanistan’s High Council for National Reconciliation Dr. Abdullah Abdullah to discuss the United States’ review of its strategy in Afghanistan.  The Secretary thanked Dr. Abdullah for his vital work in support of the Afghanistan peace process, and he expressed America’s resolve to support a just and durable political settlement and permanent and comprehensive ceasefire in Afghanistan.

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