October 21, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Afghan President Ghani

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani today to reiterate the strong and enduring U.S. commitment to Afghanistan.  The Secretary and President Ghani emphasized the need to accelerate peace negotiations and achieve a political settlement that is inclusive, respects the rights of all Afghans, including women and minorities, allows the Afghan people to have a say in choosing their leaders, and prevents Afghan soil from being used to threaten the United States and its allies and partners.  Both leaders condemned the ongoing Taliban attacks, which show little regard for human life and human rights, and deplored the loss of innocent Afghan lives and displacement of the civilian population.  Secretary Blinken and President Ghani pledged to remain in close contact going forward.

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