Secretary Antony J. Blinken with Bruneian Foreign Minister II Dato Erywan Yusof Before Their Meeting

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

London, United Kingdom

Grosvenor House Hotel

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Well, welcome.  Mr. Minister, it’s so good to see you.  I’m glad that having spoken on the phone, we now have an opportunity to connect face to face, or mask to mask.  And I’m so glad to see you both for the important work we get to do on a bilateral basis, but also based on your tenure now as the chair of ASEAN, the very important work that ASEAN is doing, including with regard to Myanmar and many other issues.  So I welcome the opportunity to spend some time.  Welcome.

FOREIGN MINISTER YUSOF:  Excellency, firstly, thank you for having this meeting with me.  First and foremost, I’d like to appreciate our close bilateral relation, and His Highness’s wish to convey his regards to the President.  Our relationship has been quite long, and it has been quite close, so we look forward to working closely on bilateral issues, and also on matters of regional and international concern.  Thank you very much.

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    In U.S GAO News
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    In U.S GAO News
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