September 22, 2021

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Secretary Antony J. Blinken at Top of Meeting with German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas

12 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

Germany

USAFE, Ramstein Air Base

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Well, first of all, good to see all of my friends and colleagues.  I think we’ll have an opportunity to speak to our colleagues from the media a little later this afternoon.  But in the first instance, it’s so good to see you, good to be with all of you.  And we have a lot to – (inaudible) but it’s particularly good to be back in Germany and see firsthand here today the remarkable partnership that we have, including the work that we’re doing together in the evacuation of people from Afghanistan, and the work we’re going to be doing shortly with many other countries to talk about the way forward on Afghanistan.  But I know we’ll have the chance to talk about all of that a little bit later.  Heiko, it’s very good to see you.

FOREIGN MINISTER MAAS:  Yes, thank you very much, Tony.  And welcome to the most American part of Germany.  Let me say it in German; I can assure you, only some friendly words.  

(In German.)

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