October 19, 2021

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Secretary Antony J. Blinken And Saudi Foreign Minister Faisal bin Farhan Al Saud Before Their Meeting 

25 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

Washington, D.C.

Benjamin Franklin Room

FOREIGN MINISTER AL SAUD:  Good afternoon.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Good afternoon, everyone.  It’s a real pleasure to have my friend and colleague, the Saudi Foreign Minister, here.  Faisal and I have been working very closely together these many months that we’ve been in office, and I’m especially happy to have an opportunity to have you here at the State Department in Washington.

We have a strong partnership between the United States and Saudi Arabia.  We are committed to the defense of the Kingdom.  We have a lot of work that we’re doing together on a variety of very significant issues, from climate to energy to Yemen to Iran.  So we have a full agenda, including also talking about the continued progress we hope to see in Saudi Arabia on rights.

But there is, I think, a fundamental proposition, which is that for us this partnership with Saudi Arabia is an important one, a vital one, and in terms of dealing with some of the most significant challenges we face, one that we are very appreciative of.  So Faisal, it’s very good to have you here.

FOREIGN MINISTER AL SAUD:  Thank you, Mr. Secretary.  Thank you, Tony.  It’s great to be here in Washington.  As you said, lots to talk about.  Important relationship.  And our relationship has delivered immense value for both of our countries, but not just for us, also for the region and for the world.

We’re going to talk about regional security and how we can work together on that, but also, as you mentioned, climate change, energy, recovery from COVID-19.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Yes. 

FOREIGN MINISTER AL SAUD:  All of these issues, important issues.  And it just shows how important and strong this partnership is, and I look forward to the conversation.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Thank you.  It’s great to have you.  Thanks, everyone.

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