October 19, 2021

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Secretary Antony J. Blinken and EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy and Vice President of the European Commission Josep Borrell Before Their Meeting

20 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

Josep Borrell, EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy and Vice President of the European Commission

New York City, New York

The Palace Hotel

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Good afternoon, everyone.  It is a real pleasure to be able to spend some time with my good friend and colleague Josep Borrell.  We’ve spent a lot of time already in recent months working very closely together, but really today building off of the very important and productive U.S.-EU summit that President Biden took part in.  A lot of what we’ve been doing since then, including the establishment of the Trade and Technology Council, (inaudible) we look forward to in the coming weeks, and a lot to talk about about the work that we do together quite literally around the world, including, of course, Afghanistan, the Indo-Pacific, in Europe, and beyond.

So Josep, (inaudible) to see you as always and I look forward to our conversation.

MR BORRELL:  Thank you.  Thank you.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  (Inaudible.)

MR BORRELL:  Thank you, Tony, for these meetings.  A great pleasure to meet you again.  We (inaudible) morning (inaudible).  We are crossing the (inaudible), and I am sure that we are going to talk about the recent issues with which we can build a stronger confidence from us following the conversations that have been taking place this morning (inaudible).  I’m sure we will (inaudible).

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Thank you.  Good to see you.  Thank you very much.

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