October 18, 2021

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Secretary Antony J. Blinken And Brazilian Foreign Minister Carlos Franca Before Their Meeting

11 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

New York City, New York

Palace Hotel

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Well, it’s wonderful to finally get a chance to see each other, Carlos, in person.  The foreign minister and I have had an opportunity to speak several times on the phone, but this was an important opportunity for us to get together in person.  We have a lot to talk about, a lot to cover, but I would simply say that as the two largest countries in the hemisphere with so many strong interests in common, it’s particularly timely that we have a chance to get together and talk about a number of the very important things on the agenda.  And we also had the back-to-back of President Bolsonaro and President Biden speaking —

FOREIGN MINISTER FRANCA:  That’s right.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  — this morning at the General Assembly, for which (inaudible).  But mostly, Carlos, thank you for being here and the opportunity to get to work on a number of things.  So welcome.

FOREIGN MINISTER FRANCA:  Thank you very much, Secretary Blinken, and (inaudible) we are very glad to be here for our first person-to-person meeting after all our conversations, the phone conversation in June (inaudible) the United States is a very, very close ally of Brazil, a very close partner.  So I’m happy to be with you here and I’m looking forward to (inaudible) very broad and profound agenda we have (inaudible).  Thank you.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Thanks so much.

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