Sanctioning Companies Supporting Iran’s Metal Industry

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

Today, the United States is imposing sanctions on 17 companies and one individual in connection with Iran’s metals industry. The Iranian regime uses revenue from its metals sector to fund the regime’s destabilizing activities around the world.

The Department of State is designating China-based Kaifeng Pingmei New Carbon Materials Technology Co., LTD (KFCC) and Iran-based Hafez Darya Arya Shipping Company (HDASCO), a subsidiary of the Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping Lines (IRISL), pursuant to Section 1245(a)(1)(C)(i)(II) of the Iran Freedom and Counter-Proliferation Act of 2012 (IFCA). Both companies knowingly sold, supplied, or transferred, directly or indirectly, graphite to or from Iran and such graphite was sold, supplied, or transferred to or from an Iranian person (South Kaveh Steel Company and Arfa Iron and Steel Company) included on the Department of Treasury’s Specially Designated Nationals List. The State Department is also imposing sanctions on Majid Sajdeh, who is a principal executive officer of HDASCO.

The Department of the Treasury further designated 16 companies that are active in Iran’s metal industry, pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) 13871. Iran-based Pasargad Steel Complex, and Vian Steel Complex, Gilan Steel Complex Company, Khazar Steel Co., South Rouhina Steel Complex, Yazd Industrial Constructional Steel Rolling Mill, West Alborz Steel Complex, Esfarayen Industrial Complex, Bonab Steel Industry Complex, Sirjan Iranian Steel, Zarand Iranian Steel Company, and Middle East Mines and Mineral Industries Development Holding Company were designated pursuant to Section 1(a)(i) of E.O. 13871 for operating in the steel sector of Iran, or for owning or controlling companies that operate in the steel sector of Iran.

Additionally, Germany-based GMI Projects Hamburg GmbH, UK-based GMI Projects Ltd., and China-based World Mining Industry Co., Ltd. were designated pursuant to Section 1(a)(v) of E.O. 13871 for being owned or controlled by Middle East Mines and Mineral Industries Development Holding Company. Treasury is also concurrently designating KFCC pursuant to Section 1(a)(iv) of E.O. 13871 for having materially assisted, sponsored, or provided financial, material, or technological support for, or goods or services in support of, Pasargad Steel Complex, a person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to E.O. 13871.

The United States will continue to aggressively implement sanctions with respect to the Iranian regime, those who evade sanctions, and others who enable the regime to fund and carry out its malign agenda of repression and terror.

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    In U.S GAO News
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    In Crime News
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    In U.S GAO News
    As of September 2020, 19 of the 24 Department of Homeland Security (DHS) programs GAO assessed that had DHS approved acquisition program baselines were meeting their currently established goals. However, of the 24 programs, ten had been in breach of their cost or schedule goals, or both, at some point during fiscal year 2020. A few programs experienced breaches related to external factors, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, while others breached their baseline goals because of acquisition management issues. Five of these programs rebaselined to increase costs or delay schedules, but the remaining five were still in breach status as of September 2020 (see table). Further, GAO found that some of the 19 programs that were meeting their currently established goals—including the U.S. Coast Guard's Offshore Patrol Cutter program—are at risk of future cost growth or schedule slips. DHS Major Acquisition Programs In Breach of Approved Cost or Schedule Goals (or Both) As of September 2020. Program (estimated life-cycle cost) Breach Type National Cybersecurity Protection System ($5,908 million) Schedule Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology ($3,923 million) Cost and Schedule Grants Management Modernization ($289 million) Cost and Schedule National Bio Agro-Defense Facility ($1,298 million) Schedule Medium Range Surveillance Aircraft ($15,187 million) Schedule Source: GAO analysis of Department of Homeland Security (DHS) data. | GAO-21-175 Note: The life-cycle cost information is the current acquisition program baseline cost goal as of September 2020. Programs may revise cost goals, if necessary, when the new baseline is approved. GAO found that supplemental guidance for the development of acquisition documents generally aligned with requirements in DHS's acquisition management policy. However, guidance for developing acquisition documentation in DHS's Systems Engineering Life Cycle Instruction and accompanying Guidebook does not reflect current requirements in DHS's acquisition management policy. DHS officials stated that the information related to development of acquisition documents—including the systems engineering life cycle tailoring plan—should be consistent across all of DHS's policies, instructions, and guidebooks. Inconsistent agency-wide guidance can lead to a lack of clarity on when programs should submit their program documentation. The Joint Explanatory Statement accompanying a bill to the DHS Appropriations Act, 2019, directed DHS to provide quarterly briefings on summary ratings for all major acquisition programs. While DHS is meeting this direction with summary ratings, the ratings do not include contextual information, such as programs' cost, schedule, or performance risks. This type of information would help Congress understand how the ratings relate to potential program outcomes. Determining what additional risk information is needed for DHS's major acquisition programs along with the reporting timeframes and the appropriate mechanism to provide the information, would help ensure that decision makers have needed context. DHS plans to spend more than $7 billion on its portfolio of major acquisition programs—with life-cycle costs over $300 million— in fiscal year 2021 to help execute its many critical missions. The Explanatory Statement accompanying the DHS Appropriations Act, 2015, included a provision for GAO to review DHS's major acquisitions on an ongoing basis. This report, GAO's sixth review, assesses the extent to which (1) DHS's major acquisition programs are meeting baseline goals, (2) DHS's guidance for developing acquisition documentation is consistent with DHS acquisition policy, and (3) DHS is reporting relevant information to Congress on its portfolio of major acquisition programs. GAO assessed 24 acquisition programs, including DHS's largest programs that were in the process of obtaining new capabilities as of April 2018, and programs GAO or DHS identified as at risk of poor outcomes. GAO assessed cost and schedule progress against baselines; assessed DHS's congressional reporting requirements; and interviewed DHS officials and congressional appropriations committee staff. GAO is making one recommendation for DHS to align acquisition guidance with policy, and one matter for Congress to consider determining what additional information it needs to perform oversight. DHS concurred with our recommendation. For more information, contact Marie A. Mak at (202) 512-4841 or makm@gao.gov.
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    In Crime News
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    In Crime News
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    In Crime News
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