Samoa Independence Day

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, I offer my congratulations to the people of Samoa on the occasion of the fifty-ninth anniversary of your independence on June 1, 2021.

The United States and Samoa have enjoyed a close friendship that began with your independence in 1962.  Most recently, we have worked together to combat COVID-19 and other health threats.  The United States is committed to collaborating with you and our partners in the region to help ensure Samoa and neighboring Pacific Island countries recover quickly from the impacts of the pandemic.  We also look forward to working with Samoa and other Pacific Island countries to combat climate change.

This year, in the aftermath of the general election in Samoa, the United States calls on Samoa’s leaders to respect democratic processes and uphold the rule of law.  These values, and our shared love of freedom and human rights, are the foundation of our democratic societies.

Happy Independence Day to all Samoans.

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