Saint Lucia Independence Day

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the United States Government, it is my pleasure to congratulate the people of Saint Lucia on the occasion of their 42nd independence day.

The United States values Saint Lucia’s regional leadership and partnership.  We continue to take steps forward together in education, entrepreneurship, and youth development, while combatting the pandemic.  This year, we completed the Early Learners Program, through which more than 90 schools received reading materials and teacher training to improve literacy among primary students.  Together with Taiwan, we promoted business development through entrepreneurship networks and startup incubators.  We appreciate Saint Lucia’s consistent voice for democracy and human rights in the hemisphere.

We are proud of our strong bilateral relationship, and we look forward to continuing to work with Saint Lucia toward a more secure, prosperous, resilient, and democratic Caribbean.

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