Russia National Day

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, I congratulate the citizens of Russia as you celebrate Russia Day.  This holiday marks the significant step Russia made on June 12, 1991, when it held its first free, open, and fair elections, and adopted the Declaration of Russian State Sovereignty.  This important document recognized the democratic aspirations and sovereignty of the peoples of Russia and guaranteed their rights and equal protections under the rule of law, and their right to life and dignity, honoring their centuries of history, culture, and traditions.

I take this opportunity to reaffirm the United States’ desire for constructive engagement with the government of the Russian Federation in the interest of promoting a more stable and predictable bilateral relationship.  Likewise, we remain steadfastly committed to supporting the Russian people as they continue to build on the aspirations outlined in the Declaration of Russian State Sovereignty and their desire to work together with the international community and cooperate peacefully on matters of global concern.

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