Robstown man gets huge sentence for sexual exploitation of a child

A 53-year-old local man has been ordered to federal prison for conspiring to entice a minor to engage in sexually explicit conduct for the purpose of producing child pornography

Read full article at: https://www.justice.gov May 31, 2021

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    A former Gulfport, Mississippi, tax return preparer was sentenced to 46 months in prison today for aiding and assisting in the preparation of false returns, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division and U.S. Attorney Mike Hurst for the Southern District of Mississippi.
    [Read More…]
  • Antigua and Barbuda Travel Advisory
    In Travel
    Reconsider travel to [Read More…]
  • Ex-law enforcement officer sent to prison for transporting purported drug money
    In Justice News
    A former deputy [Read More…]
  • Paraguay Independence Day
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Suburban Chicago Man Sentenced to 12 Years in Federal Prison for Conspiring to Provide Material Support to ISIS
    In Crime News
    An Illinois man was sentenced today to 12 years in prison for conspiring to provide material support to the Islamic State of Iraq and al Sham, a foreign terrorist organization (aka ISIS).
    [Read More…]
  • Secretary Antony J. Blinken, Greenlandic Premier Mute Egede, Greenlandic Foreign Minister Pele Broberg, And Danish Foreign Minister Jeppe Kofod At a Joint Press Availability
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]