October 19, 2021

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Registration is Open for the Indo-Pacific Business Forum 2021

14 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The United States government, in partnership with the Government of India, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Confederation of Indian Industry, the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry, the US-ASEAN Business Council, the U.S.-India Business Council, and the U.S.-India Strategic Partnership Forum, is pleased to announce registration is now open for the fourth annual Indo-Pacific Business Forum (IPBF).  This year’s IPBF will be a fully virtual event held from October 28-29, 2021, with a schedule that will ensure participants from across the Indo-Pacific can join.

The IPBF advances a vision for an Indo-Pacific region that is free, open, and inclusive.  Government and business leaders from the United States, India, and across the Indo-Pacific region will exchange ideas through interactive discussions based on three broad themes:  economic recovery and resilience; climate action; and digital innovation.  Attendees will also be able to explore regional government and business partnerships and commercial opportunities.  The IPBF will showcase high-impact private sector investment and government efforts to support market competition, job growth, and high-standard development for greater prosperity and economic inclusion in the Indo-Pacific.  The event will be conducted via a secure online conferencing platform.

Registration for this virtual event is free and is currently open to interested members of the public here: www.indopacificbusinessforum.com

The 2021 IPBF will be on-the-record and interested members of the media can register here: www.indopacificbusinessforum.com

For further information, please visit the Indo-Pacific Business Forum website at https://www.indopacificbusinessforum.com/

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