Regional 100,000 Strong in the Americas Innovation Fund Competition to Build Partnerships between the United States and the Dominican Republic and Central America

Office of the Spokesperson

On March 17, the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs and U.S. Embassy Guatemala announced a new regional 100,000 Strong in the Americas (100K) Innovation Fund competition with the support of AgroAmerica — the second multinational company based in Guatemala to join the 100K Fund.

This regional 100K competition will provide twelve grants of $25,000 each to build higher education partnerships and create new, innovative training and exchange programs between the United States and the region starting in late 2021/early 2022.  Thematic areas include Environment; Public Health; Climate Solutions; Health Sciences; Human Rights; Education Technology; Food and Agricultural Sciences; Water, Sanitation, Hygiene; Business Development; Engineering; among other disciplines.

The United States supports the 100,000 Strong in the Americas Innovation Fund because this it connects U.S. universities, community colleges, and technical schools with education institutions throughout Latin America and the Caribbean to create new models of academic exchanges. The public-private partnerships that support the Innovation Fund include investments from the WHA Bureau, NGOs, and over 28 companies, foundations, and regional government entities throughout the Americas to strengthen regional education cooperation and competitiveness. Working across sectors, the 100K Fund helps to develop solutions in public health, address climate issues, spur inclusive economic development, and grow economies to expand opportunity and democracy for all.

Since its inception in 2013, the 100K Innovation Fund has awarded almost 250 grants (over $6,250,000), connecting almost 500 higher education institutions working in 25 countries and 48 U.S. states. As a result of innovative 100K partnerships, more students and faculty in the Hemisphere have access to training and workforce development programs.

For more information: www.100kstrongamericas.org  #100kStrongAmericas

 

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    In U.S GAO News
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