October 19, 2021

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Readout of U.S. Attorney General Merrick B. Garland’s Meeting with Mexico Attorney General Alejandro Gertz Manero

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<div>U.S. Attorney General Merrick B. Garland met in Washington, D.C. yesterday afternoon with Mexico Attorney General Alejandro Gertz Manero. The two leaders reaffirmed their commitment to work closely on criminal investigations and prosecutions of cross-border crime, including with regard to narcotics and firearms trafficking, human smuggling and trafficking, and illicit finance and money laundering. The Attorneys General also agreed on the importance of our extradition relationship, and committed to vigorously pursuing the extradition requests pending in each of our countries. </div>
U.S. Attorney General Merrick B. Garland met in Washington, D.C. yesterday afternoon with Mexico Attorney General Alejandro Gertz Manero. The two leaders reaffirmed their commitment to work closely on criminal investigations and prosecutions of cross-border crime, including with regard to narcotics and firearms trafficking, human smuggling and trafficking, and illicit finance and money laundering. The Attorneys General also agreed on the importance of our extradition relationship, and committed to vigorously pursuing the extradition requests pending in each of our countries. 

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