Putting the public in public health: KidneyX COVID-19 Kidney Care Challenge Winners

When COVID-19 hit the United States last year, we began to see the toll that the pandemic took on those with chronic diseases. Kidney disease was one of them. People who have chronic and advanced kidney diseases are at a higher risk of complications from COVID-19, and kidney injury is a major complication of COVID-19. With our Kidney Innovation Accelerator (KidneyX) partner, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN), we designed a challenge to address the impact of COVID-19 on kidney care through promotion of solutions developed by those living with kidney disease and front-line caregivers. As with all of KidneyX’s prize competitions, there was a sense of urgency for innovation to improve the lives of people with kidney diseases.

On April 6, 2021, we announced seven winners of round 2 for this challenge, the KidneyX COVID-19 Kidney Care Challenge, adding to the 8 winners from round 1. These winners created a broad set of solutions that can reduce the transmission of coronavirus among people with kidney disease, as well as their care partners and health care teams. We are amazed by the ingenuity of the solutions and honored to award $20,000 each in recognition. The winner announcement is the culmination of a new way of advancing kidney care from unlikely sources.

In the process of designing the KidneyX COVID-19 Kidney Care Challenge, we wanted to understand the full scope of what was happening around kidney care and COVID-19. During an ASN-HHS COVID-19 Scarce Resources Roundtable discussion, we discovered that people who were treating kidney patients during the first wave of the pandemic made their own solutions to protect patients and the healthcare staff, and ensure resiliency of kidney care services. With the KidneyX COVID-19 Care Challenge, our question was: How can these innovative solutions be scaled and applied in other settings around the country?

Traditionally, medical research is done by large research institutions. But we recognized that public health activities must include and impact patients and patient care in a meaningful way. By designing this prize challenge to directly solicit solutions from people at the ground level, we not only involved them in the research process, we gained better understanding of challenges that are being faced in everyday care centers.

Since 2018, the goal of the Kidney Innovation Accelerator has been to seed disruptive ideas from both likely and unlikely innovators with a focus on supporting a collaborative and vibrant community that can continue to push the boundaries of innovation. The COVID-19 Kidney Care Challenge tested this mission in new ways. It reinforced our conviction that people with lived experience are in the best position to identify challenges and suggest solutions.

For patients, caregivers, and people at the forefront of kidney care – we hear you and understand your wish for direct engagement and the ability to bring ideas to the forefront of care. We plan to host more prize challenges in the future with this goal. The KidneyX COVID-19 Kidney Care Challenge has proven that good ideas come from all levels of the healthcare system.

To learn about each individual winner, read the ASN press release here.

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    A firm protested the General Services Administration (GSA) decision to increase its required office space under an existing contract, contending that since GSA failed to afford it an opportunity to bid on the additional space, GSA should: (1) resolicit its requirements; and (2) allow it an opportunity to bid on the current requirements. GAO held that it would not consider the protest, since there was a pending appeal concerning the initial award of the lease, which could ultimately render any GAO decision academic. Accordingly, the protest was dismissed.
    [Read More…]
  • Secretary Pompeo’s Meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Suga
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Singapore Travel Advisory
    In Travel
    Reconsider travel to [Read More…]
  • Acting Assistant Attorney General Brian C. Rabbitt Delivers Remarks at Health Care Fraud Takedown Press Conference
    In Crime News
    Good morning and thank you for joining us today. We are here this morning to announce the results of truly historic nationwide law enforcement operations led by the Criminal Division’s Health Care Fraud Strike Force Program — part of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section.
    [Read More…]
  • Two Individuals And Two Companies Sentenced In Scheme To Fraudulently Sell Popular Dietary Supplements
    In Crime News
    A federal court in Texas sentenced two former dietary supplement company executives to prison and ordered two companies to pay a combined $10.7 million in criminal forfeiture for their roles in fraudulently selling popular workout supplements, the Justice Department announced today.
    [Read More…]
  • Statement of Assistant Attorney General for National Security John C. Demers on the Public Release of the Department’s Findings with Respect to the 29 FISA Applications that Were the Subject of the March 2020 OIG Preliminary Report
    In Crime News
    “The Department of Justice has completed its review of the 29 FISA applications that were the subject of preliminary findings by the DOJ Inspector General (OIG) in March 2020.  We are pleased that our review of these applications concluded that all contained sufficient basis for probable cause and uncovered only two material errors, neither of which invalidated the authorizations granted by the FISA Court.   These findings, together with the more than 40 corrective actions undertaken by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the National Security Division, should instill confidence in the FBI’s use of FISA authorities.  We would like to express our appreciation to the OIG for their focus on the Department’s use of its national security authority.  We remain committed to improving the FISA process to ensure that we use these tools consistent with the law and our obligations to the FISA Court.  The ability to surveil and to investigate using FISA authorities remains critical to confronting current national security threats, including election interference, Chinese espionage and terrorism.”      
    [Read More…]
  • Readout of Attorney General William P. Barr’s Visits to Chicago and Phoenix
    In Crime News
    This week, Attorney General William P. Barr traveled to Chicago, Illinois, and Phoenix, Arizona, to announce updates on Operation Legend and the results of Operation Crystal Shield, respectively.
    [Read More…]
  • Louisiana Man Indicted for Attempted Murder of a Gay Man and Plot to Kidnap and Murder Other Gay Men
    In Crime News
    A Louisiana man was indicted and charged today in federal court in the Western District of Louisiana on six counts, including hate crime, kidnapping, firearm and obstruction charges.
    [Read More…]