Public Health and the Draw Down of the Migrant Protection Protocols Program

Office of the Spokesperson

The Administration’s policy is to protect our national and border security, address the humanitarian challenges at the U.S.-Mexico border, and ensure public health and safety.  The Departments of State and Homeland Security are coordinating closely with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as well as the Mexican government and international organization partners to implement the draw down of the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP, also known as “Remain in Mexico”) program with an emphasis on full compliance with federal, state, and local health orders.

Through the State Department’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, the United States is funding international organization partners with experience conducting medical screening for migrant populations around the world to assist individuals prior to arrival at U.S. ports of entry.  This process involves close coordination with the Mexican government’s health authorities and system.

Upon arrival of individuals at staging locations outside the United States, partner organizations will provide all pre-registered individuals with active MPP cases and all individuals working on site with a face mask that complies with the guidelines of the CDC, if they did not bring their own.  Face masks will be worn at all times during staging and transport, and spaces will be configured to ensure physical distancing.

Partner organizations will coordinate antigen testing, temperature checks, and health questionnaires in line with CDC guidance and recommendations to identify individuals with active COVID-19 infections, recent close contact with an individual with COVID-19, or other communicable diseases.  Individuals with active MPP cases do not need to obtain a COVID-19 test outside of this process because our partner organizations will test them upon arrival at a staging location.

Antigen testing for COVID-19 will take place upon arrival at a staging location, in most cases within 24 hours of travel to a U.S. port of entry.  In accordance with CDC recommendations, testing will be repeated if the initial test was not within three days of the arrival of an individual to a U.S. port of entry.  The staging areas will be configured to cordon off an area for individuals who have received negative antigen tests so that they do not come in contact with other individuals.

Individuals who test positive for COVID-19 and have mild or no symptoms will be required to isolate for ten days in accordance with local Mexican health authority policy and CDC guidance.  Individuals who test positive with severe symptoms will receive treatment through the Mexican health system.  Accompanying family members will also quarantine in line with CDC guidance and requirements of Mexican health authorities.  In all locations, family unity will be prioritized at all times.  Once individuals who are infected complete their isolation periods and do not display a fever for 24 hours without fever-reducing medication, and exposed family members complete their quarantine periods, our partner organizations will once again consider facilitating their arrival at a U.S. port of entry.

Partner organizations will provide documentation of a negative COVID-19 test or completion of isolation to the individuals prior to arrival at the U.S. port of entry.  Partner organizations will also provide documentation of completion of quarantine for family members of individuals who test positive for COVID-19.

The partner organizations will also provide each individual being manifested for arrival at a U.S. port of entry with a CDC health information card that recommends COVID-19 testing for travelers three to five days after arrival and self-quarantining for seven days, or self-quarantining for 10 days if travelers are not tested.

After individuals are confirmed to have an active MPP case and successfully undergoing these COVID-19 protocols, our partner organizations will transport the individuals to a U.S. port of entry in accordance with physical distancing guidelines.

For further information, please email PRMPress@state.gov.

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    Attorney General Merrick B. Garland has appointed Mary Ida Townson as the U.S. Trustee for Florida, Georgia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands (Region 21). Ms. Townson will assume her duties in June and will replace Nancy Gargula, who is the U.S. Trustee in Region 10 and who has served as the interim U.S. Trustee in Region 21 since April 2019.
    [Read More…]
  • Attorney General Announces Task Force to Combat COVID-19 Fraud
    In Crime News
    U.S. Attorney General Merrick B. Garland today directed the establishment of the COVID-19 Fraud Enforcement Task Force to marshal the resources of the Department of Justice in partnership with agencies across government to enhance enforcement efforts against COVID-19 related fraud.
    [Read More…]
  • Assistant Attorney General Makan Delrahim Delivers Remarks at Virtual MOU Signing Ceremony with Korean Prosecution Service
    In Crime News
    It is with great pleasure that I sign this Memorandum of Understanding on behalf of the Department of Justice alongside my good friend, Prosecutor General Yoon. Enhancing the ties between our agencies has been an important priority for me during my tenure as Assistant Attorney General of the Antitrust Division. While only a few years ago we knew comparatively little about one another, our relationship has quickly blossomed into a strong and enduring friendship. I am extremely pleased that we have succeeded in developing important and lasting ties between our agencies, as underscored by our signing of this Memorandum of Understanding today.
    [Read More…]
  • Attorney General William P. Barr Remarks at White House Roundtable on Housing Assistance Grants for Victims of Human Trafficking, Remarks as Prepared for Delivery
    In Crime News
    Thank you for being here. The scourge of human trafficking is the modern-day equivalent of slavery. Eradicating this horrific crime and helping its victims are top priorities for President Trump’s Administration, including the Department of Justice. I thank the President for his steadfast commitment to this issue, and I thank Ivanka for her leadership and for hosting us today. I also thank all the survivors and their advocates here for their courage and determination to end this evil practice.
    [Read More…]
  • More than 700 Members Of Transnational Organized Crime Groups Arrested in Central America in U.S. Assisted Operation
    In Crime News
    Today, senior law enforcement officials from the United States, El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras announced criminal charges in Central America against more than 700 members of transnational criminal organizations, primarily MS-13 and 18th Street gangs, which resulted from a one-week coordinated law enforcement action under Operation Regional Shield (ORS).
    [Read More…]
  • Compounding Pharmacy Mogul Sentenced for Multimillion-Dollar Health Care Fraud Scheme
    In Crime News
    A Mississippi businessman was sentenced today for his role in a multimillion-dollar scheme to defraud TRICARE, the health care benefit program serving U.S. military, veterans, and their respective family members, as well as private health care benefit programs.
    [Read More…]
  • Local man found guilty of violent robbery attempt
    In Justice News
    A Corpus Christi federal [Read More…]
  • Disaster Block Grants: Factors to Consider in Authorizing a Permanent Program
    In U.S GAO News
    What GAO Found In March 2019, GAO reported that because the Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR) program lacks permanent authority and regulations—unlike other disaster assistance programs—appropriations require the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to customize grant requirements for each disaster in Federal Register notices—a time-consuming process. GAO identified challenges associated with the lack of permanent statutory authority, including delays in disbursal of funds and the need for grantees to manage multiple grants with different rules. For example, GAO found it took HUD 5 months after the first appropriation for the 2017 hurricanes (Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria) for HUD to issue the first Federal Register notice establishing the grant requirements. Officials from one of the 2017 CDBG-DR grantees told GAO of challenges managing multiple CDBG-DR grants it received over the years because each grant had different rules. HUD officials noted then that permanently authorizing CDBG-DR would allow HUD to issue permanent regulations for disaster recovery. GAO identified factors to consider when weighing whether and how to permanently authorize a program for unmet disaster assistance needs. These factors, which are based on GAO's body of work on emergency management and past observations of broader government initiatives, include the following: Clarify how the program would fit into the broader federal disaster framework. GAO has emphasized the importance of articulating a program's relationship to other programs and of aligning the program within organizations with compatible missions and goals. This is particularly important with disaster programs, given the approximately 30 agencies involved in disaster recovery. Clarify the purpose and design the program to address it. Greater clarity about the purpose of CDBG-DR could help resolve implementation issues GAO has previously identified, such as how much time grantees should have to spend funds and the proportion of funds that should be distributed to renters. Consider the necessary capacity and support infrastructure to implement the program. GAO's prior work found that state, local, territorial, and tribal grantees and federal agencies faced capacity challenges in administering and overseeing federal grant funds, including CDBG-DR. Capacity challenges for grantees may contribute to fraud risks and slow expenditure of funds. Why GAO Did This Study Legislation proposed over the years would permanently authorize CDBG-DR or a similar program, but no proposal has been enacted. Since 1993, Congress has provided over $90 billion in supplemental appropriations through HUD's CDBG program to help communities recover from disasters. Just since 2001, HUD has issued over 100 Federal Register notices linked to these funds. Communities use these funds to address unmet needs for housing, infrastructure, and economic revitalization. HUD is one of approximately 30 federal agencies tasked with disaster recovery. This testimony discusses (1) challenges associated with the lack of permanent statutory authority for CDBG-DR and (2) factors to consider when weighing whether and how to permanently authorize CDBG-DR or a similar program. It is based primarily on GAO's March 2019 and May 2021 reports on CDBG-DR (GAO-19-232 and GAO-21-177) and GAO reports issued between February 2004 and June 2019 that identified factors to consider in making critical federal policy decisions. For those reports, GAO reviewed documentation on CDBG-DR and its observations of efforts to reorganize or streamline government, among other things.
    [Read More…]
  • Former Army Green Beret Pleads Guilty to Russian Espionage Conspiracy
    In Crime News
     A former Army Green Beret pleaded guilty today to conspiring with Russian intelligence operatives to provide them with United States national defense information.
    [Read More…]
  • Secretary Blinken’s Call with Saudi Foreign Minister Faisal bin Farhan Al Saud
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Public Designation of Albanian Sali Berisha Due to Involvement in Significant Corruption
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • California University To Pay $225,000 For Allegedly Violating Ban On Incentive Compensation
    In Crime News
    San Diego Christian College (SDCC), based in Santee, California, will pay $225,000 to resolve allegations under the False Claims Act for submitting false claims to the U.S. Department of Education in violation of the federal ban on incentive-based compensation, the Justice Department announced today.
    [Read More…]
  • Statement of Attorney General Merrick B. Garland on the Life of Judge Robert Katzmann
    In Crime News
    U.S. Attorney General Merrick B. Garland made the following statement on the passing of Judge Robert Katzmann:
    [Read More…]
  • Spinoff Highlights NASA Technology Paying Dividends in the US Economy
    In Space
    NASA’s technology [Read More…]
  • Montserrat Travel Advisory
    In Travel
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  • Responding to Modern Cyber Threats with Diplomacy and Deterrence
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Dr. Christopher Ashley [Read More…]
  • Assistant Attorney General Makan Delrahim Announces Re-Organization of the Antitrust Division’s Civil Enforcement Program
    In Crime News
    The Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division announced today that it is creating the Office of Decree Enforcement and Compliance and a Civil Conduct Task Force.  Additionally, it will redistribute matters among its six civil sections in order to build expertise based on current trends in the economy.
    [Read More…]
  • Removing the Cuban Military’s Grip from Cuba’s Banking Sector
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]
  • Congratulations to Bolivia’s President-Elect Luis Arce
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]