October 21, 2021

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Public Designation of Albanian Sali Berisha Due to Involvement in Significant Corruption

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Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

Today, I am announcing the public designation of Sali Berisha, a former President of Albania, former Prime Minister of Albania, and former Member of Parliament of Albania, due to his involvement in significant corruption.  In his official capacity as Prime Minister of Albania in particular, Berisha was involved in corrupt acts, such as misappropriation of public funds and interfering with public processes, including using his power for his own benefit and to enrich his political allies and his family members at the expense of the Albanian public’s confidence in their government institutions and public officials.  Furthermore, his own rhetoric demonstrates he is willing to protect himself, his family members, and his political allies at the expense of independent investigations, anticorruption efforts, and accountability measures.  With this designation, I am reaffirming the need for accountability and transparency in Albania’s democratic institutions, government processes, and the actions of Albanian public officials.

This designation is made under Section 7031(c) of the Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2021. In addition to Berisha, I am publicly designating his spouse, Liri Berisha, his son, Shkelzen Berisha, and his daughter, Argita Berisha Malltezi. These individuals are ineligible to travel to the United States.

This designation reaffirms the U.S. commitment to supporting political reforms key to Albania’s democratic institutions.  The United States continues to stand with the people of Albania.  The Department will continue to use authorities like this to promote accountability for corrupt actors in this region and globally.

For more information, please contact INL-PAPD@state.gov.

More from: Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

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