October 21, 2021

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Passing of Niger’s Ambassador to the United States

9 min read

Cale Brown, Principal Deputy Spokesperson

We are deeply saddened by the passing on December 16 of His Excellency Abdallah Wafy, Ambassador of Niger to the United States, and offer our sincere condolences to his family and all those who worked with him.  Ambassador Wafy was a valued partner and friend who worked tirelessly over the years in Washington, New York, and Niamey, to strengthen the relationship between our two countries.

Ambassador Wafy’s long career in law enforcement and diplomacy reflected his strong commitment to public service.  During his service with United Nations Peacekeeping missions and as Niger’s Ambassador to the United Nations and later to the United States, Ambassador Wafy advanced peace and security for both Niger and the wider region.  Through his leadership and skillful diplomacy, he increased understanding of the diversity of the countries of the Sahel and helped forge deeper bonds between Niger and the United States.

The Department of State honors Ambassador Wafy’s leadership and service.

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