Paraguay Independence Day

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the people of the United States, I congratulate the people of Paraguay as you celebrate the 210th anniversary of your independence.

In the face of the numerous challenges our countries have experienced this past year, we continue to strengthen our cooperation in critical areas such as health, economic prosperity, support for democracy, and security.  The United States has redoubled our efforts to support Paraguay’s response to the global COVID-19 pandemic by providing intensive care unit beds, lifesaving medications, oxygen, equipment, and laboratory analysis support.  We will continue to stand by Paraguay as our two countries work together to end this global health crisis.  Our partnership will continue to play a vital role in advancing our shared objectives for peace, prosperity, and security throughout the region.

As we celebrate this momentous occasion alongside the Paraguayan people, we are proud of the long history of friendship between our peoples, from the establishment of diplomatic relations in 1861 to our present robust cooperation.  May this spirit of partnership and shared democratic values continue to deepen our historic relationship.

More from: Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

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    Selected agencies—the Federal Aviation Administration, Indian Health Services, and Small Business Administration—had generally deployed tools intended to provide cybersecurity data to support the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation (CDM) program. As depicted in the figure, the program relies on automated tools to identify hardware and software residing on agency networks. This information is aggregated and compared to expected outcomes, such as whether actual device configuration settings meet federal benchmarks. The information is then displayed on an agency dashboard and federal dashboard. Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation Program Data Flow from Agencies to the Federal Dashboard However, while agencies reported that the program improved their network awareness, none of the three agencies had effectively implemented all key CDM program requirements. For example, the three agencies had not fully implemented requirements for managing their hardware. This was due in part to contractors, who install and troubleshoot the tools, not always providing unique identifying information. Accordingly, CDM tools did not provide an accurate count of the hardware on their networks. In addition, although most agencies implemented requirements for managing software, they were not consistently comparing configuration settings on their networks to federal core benchmarks intended to maintain a standard level of security. The agencies identified various challenges to implementing the program, including overcoming resource limitations and not being able to resolve problems directly with contractors. DHS had taken numerous steps to help manage these challenges, including tracking risks of insufficient resources, providing forums for agencies to raise concerns, and allowing agencies to provide feedback to DHS on contractor performance. In 2013, DHS established the CDM program to strengthen the cybersecurity of government networks and systems by providing tools to agencies to continuously monitor their networks. The program, with estimated costs of about $10.9 billion, intends to provide capabilities for agencies to identify, prioritize, and mitigate cybersecurity vulnerabilities. GAO was asked to review agencies' continuous monitoring practices. This report (1) examines the extent to which selected agencies have effectively implemented key CDM program requirements and (2) describes challenges agencies identified in implementing the requirements and steps DHS has taken to address these challenges. GAO selected three agencies based on reported acquisition of CDM tools. GAO evaluated the agencies' implementation of CDM asset management capabilities, conducted semi-structured interviews with agency officials, and examined DHS actions. GAO is making six recommendations to DHS, including to ensure that contractors provide unique hardware identifiers; and nine recommendations to the three selected agencies, including to compare configurations to benchmarks. DHS and the selected agencies concurred with the recommendations. For more information, contact Vijay A. D'Souza at (202) 512-6240 or dsouzav@gao.gov.
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  • Former Senior Libyan Intelligence Officer and Bomb-Maker for the Muamar Qaddafi Regime Charged for The December 21, 1988 Bombing of Pan Am Flight 103
    In Crime News
    Today, Attorney General William Barr, Director of the FBI, Christopher Wray, Assistant Attorney General for National Security John Demers, and Acting U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, Michael Sherwin, announced new charges against a former Libyan intelligence operative, Abu Agela Mas’ud Kheir Al-Marimi, aka, “Hasan Abu Ojalya Ibrahim” (Masud), for his role in building the bomb that killed 270 individuals in the destruction of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland on Dec. 21, 1988.
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  • Priority Open Recommendations: General Services Administration
    In U.S GAO News
    What GAO Found In May 2020, GAO identified eight priority recommendations for the General Services Administration (GSA). Since then, GSA has implemented four of those recommendations by, among other things, seeking authority to loan agencies funds for tenant improvement costs that would otherwise be financed as part of new leases, developing a tool to evaluate design choices, and taking steps to ensure consistent implementation and oversight of cybersecurity risk-management activities and ensure an effective agency-wide view for managing risk. In May 2021, GAO noted four remaining priority recommendations for GSA, which fall into the Federal Real Property Management area. These recommendations involve: improving decision-making related to the Department of Homeland Security's headquarters consolidation by completing a comprehensive needs assessment and cost and benefits analysis and updating cost and schedule estimates for the remaining portions of the consolidation project and viable alternatives, addressing the accuracy of publicly available street address information in GSA's real-property database, and addressing the reliability of information used to calculate reported cost savings for GSA's broker program. GSA's continued attention to these issues could lead to significant improvements in federal real property management—a high-risk area that GAO has identified as needing transformation to address economy, efficiency, or effectiveness challenges. Why GAO Did This Study Priority open recommendations are the GAO recommendations that warrant priority attention from heads of key departments or agencies because their implementation could save large amounts of money; improve congressional and/or executive branch decision-making on major issues; eliminate mismanagement, fraud, and abuse; or ensure that programs comply with laws and funds are legally spent, among other benefits. Since 2015 GAO has sent letters to selected agencies to highlight the importance of implementing such recommendations. For more information, contact David Trimble at (202) 512-2834 or trimbled@gao.gov.
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  • Statement by Acting Attorney General Jeffrey A. Rosen on the Pakistani Proceedings Relating to the Abduction and Murder of Daniel Pearl
    In Crime News
    Acting Attorney General Jeffrey A. Rosen has released the following statement:
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  • Secretary Blinken’s Call with Brazilian Foreign Minister França
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • Justice Department Sues Town of Wolcott, Connecticut, for Discrimination Against Persons with Disabilities
    In Crime News
    The Justice Department today filed a lawsuit alleging that the Town of Wolcott, Connecticut, has discriminated against persons with disabilities in violation of the Fair Housing Act.
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  • Secretary Michael R. Pompeo with Taher Baraka of Al-Arabiya
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • Former Bank Executive Sentenced to Prison for $15 Million Construction Loan Fraud
    In Crime News
    A former Kansas bank executive was sentenced to 60 months in prison today for his role in carrying out a bank fraud scheme to obtain a $15 million construction loan from 26 Kansas banks.
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  • Secretary Pompeo’s Meeting with Australian Foreign Minister Payne
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • Negative COVID-19 Test Required for Travel to the United States Beginning January 26
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • Incyte Corporation to Pay $12.6 Million to Resolve False Claims Act Allegations for Paying Kickbacks
    In Crime News
    A pharmaceutical company headquartered in Delaware has agreed to pay $12.6 million to resolve allegations that it violated the False Claims Act by paying kickbacks.
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  • 2020 International Women of Courage Award Recipients Announced
    In Women’s News
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  • The United States of America and The Republic of Korea on Working Together to Promote Cooperation between the Indo-Pacific Strategy and the New Southern Policy
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • Citizen Scientists Discover Dozens of New Cosmic Neighbors in NASA Data
    In Space
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