October 21, 2021

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Owner of Chicago Tax Preparation Business Charges with Preparing False Returns

16 min read
<div>A federal grand jury in Chicago, Illinois, returned a superseding indictment yesterday charging the owner of a tax preparation business with filing tax returns for herself and clients, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division.</div>

A federal grand jury in Chicago, Illinois, returned a superseding indictment yesterday charging the owner of a tax preparation business with filing tax returns for herself and clients, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division.

According to the superseding indictment, Eunice Salley owned and operated Tax Research and Resolution Inc., a tax preparation business located in Chicago, Illinois.  From 2016 through 2017, Salley allegedly created false W-2 Forms for clients that reported fake wages and withholdings and then falsified clients’ tax returns accordingly, in order to fraudulently claim refunds. The superseding indictment further alleges that Salley falsified her own 2017 tax return by not reporting all of the income she earned from her business.

In November 2019, Salley was charged in an indictment alleging that from 2010 through 2017, she misrepresented to a pension administrator that her relative was still alive and eligible for pension payments, even though the relative was no longer eligible due to her death in 2009. Salley allegedly used the pension funds her own benefit.

If convicted of the charges in today’s superseding indictment charges, Salley faces a maximum sentence of three years in prison on each count of aiding and assisting in filing a false return and filing a false return. Salley also faces a maximum of 20 years in prison for the pension fraud scheme, as well as five years in prison on each count of pension fraud. She also faces a period of supervised release, restitution, and monetary penalties.

An indictment or superseding indictment merely allege that crimes have been committed. The defendant is presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Zuckerman commended special agents of IRS-Criminal Investigation and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, who conducted the investigation, and Assistant Chief Andrew J. Kameros of the Tax Division and Assistant U.S. Attorney Barry Jonas, who are prosecuting the case.

Additional information about the Tax Division and its enforcement efforts may be found on the Division’s website.

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