On the United Kingdom’s Establishment of a Global Anti-Corruption Sanctions Regime

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The United States commends the United Kingdom on the establishment of a Global Anti-Corruption Sanctions Regime, which reinforces the U.S.-UK partnership in the fight against corruption and illicit finance.

Corruption undermines the rule of law, weakens citizens’ trust in their governments, hampers economic growth, and facilitates transnational crime and human rights abuses.  The Global Anti-Corruption-Sanctions Regime strengthens the UK’s efforts to counter corruption globally and complements ongoing U.S. initiatives, enhancing our ability to cooperate and coordinate on comparable human rights and corruption sanctions programs, such as the U.S. Global Magnitsky sanctions program.

Together, along with other allies and partners, we will seek to promote our shared values with similar tools.  Corrupt actors, and their facilitators, will not have access to our financial systems.  The United States looks forward to continuing our partnership with like-minded governments and civil society alike to defend human rights, combat corruption, and promote accountability and good governance.

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    In U.S GAO News
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    In Crime News
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    In U.S GAO News
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