September 28, 2021

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On the Passing of Former Papua New Guinean Prime Minister Morauta

14 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States, I want to convey my condolences and respect to former Prime Minister Sir Mekere Morauta’s family and the people of Papua New Guinea on his passing. Sir Mekere made invaluable contributions to the political and economic institutions of his country during his time in office. In this time of mourning, we extend our deepest sympathy and reassurances that the United States will long remember Sir Mekere as a leading statesman and dedicated public servant.

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