On the Loss of Life Due to Significant Flooding in Central Vietnam

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

The Government of the United States expresses its deepest condolences to the Government and people of Vietnam as they mourn those who perished due to significant flooding in the central region of Vietnam as a result of Tropical Storm Linfa.  The U.S. government stands ready to assist Vietnam in addressing the damage caused by the floods, and we send our deepest sympathies to all affected by this tragedy, including the many thousands who were displaced.

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    Today, Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey A. Rosen presented remarks highlighting the Department of Justice’s work combating anti-Semitic acts at a virtual conference hosted by Secretary of State Michael Pompeo entitled “Ancient Hatred, Modern Medium”—the first ever government-sponsored event focused on online anti-Semitism. Deputy Attorney General Rosen described just a few of the Department of Justice’s many recent accomplishments in combating anti-Semitism, focusing on social media and the internet. His remarks as prepared for delivery are available here, and the full State Department conference may be viewed here.
    [Read More…]
  • Defenders Navigate Uncharted Territory During Pandemic
    In U.S Courts
    Working on the front lines of justice amid the pandemic, federal defenders are navigating uncharted territory as they work to maintain virtual access to clients in detention facilities and participate in socially distanced trials and hearings.
    [Read More…]
  • Secretary Antony J. Blinken on Release of the 2020 International Religious Freedom Report
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Acting Deputy Assistant Attorney General Robert A. Zink Delivers Remarks at Virtual GIR Live Interactive: Regional Spotlight-North America
    In Crime News
    It’s wonderful to speak with you here this morning. And I’m sorry we can’t do this in person. But I’m still delighted to have the opportunity to be here to say a few words about white-collar criminal enforcement, albeit virtually.
    [Read More…]
  • Public Designation of Current and Former Members of the Guatemalan Congress Due to Involvement in Significant Corruption
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]
  • Environment and Natural Resources Division Recognizes Employees for Outstanding Service at Annual Awards Ceremony
    In Crime News
    The Environment and Natural Resources Division (ENRD) held its annual awards ceremony to highlight the past year’s achievements.
    [Read More…]
  • Two sentenced after law enforcement uncovers illegal aliens in 100 degree trailer
    In Justice News
    A 28-year-old Laredoan [Read More…]
  • Former Government Contractor Sentenced for Role in Bribery and Kickback Scheme
    In Crime News
    A former government contractor was sentenced today for his role in a bribery and kickback scheme where he paid bribes to secure U.S. Army contracts.
    [Read More…]
  • Former Owners of Telemarketing Company Agree to Pay At Least $4 Million to Resolve False Claims Act Allegations
    In Crime News
    Two Florida men have agreed collectively to pay at least $4 million to resolve allegations that they violated the False Claims Act by engaging in schemes to generate prescriptions for compounded drugs and refer those prescriptions to pharmacies in exchange for illegal kickbacks. Many of those prescriptions were billed to TRICARE, the federal health care program providing insurance for active duty military personnel, military retirees, and military dependents.
    [Read More…]
  • Acting Assistant Secretary Peterson’s Travel to Democratic Republic of Congo
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]