October 19, 2021

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On the Killing of Rohingya Muslim Advocate Mohib Ullah

17 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

We are deeply saddened and disturbed by the murder of Rohingya Muslim advocate and community leader Mohib Ullah in Bangladesh on September 29. Mohib Ullah was a brave and fierce advocate for the human rights of Rohingya Muslims around the world. He traveled to the Human Rights Council in Geneva and to the United States to speak at the Ministerial to Advance Religious Freedom in 2019. During his trip, he shared his experiences with the President and Vice President and spoke together with other survivors of religiously motivated persecution.

We urge a full and transparent investigation into his death with the goal of holding the perpetrators of this heinous crime accountable. We will honor his work by continuing to advocate for Rohingya and lift up the voices of members of the community in decisions about their future.

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