On Latvia’s Actions to Constrain Hizballah

Cale Brown, Principal Deputy Spokesperson

The United States welcomes the Latvian government’s recent announcement that it considers Hizballah in its entirety as a terrorist organization.  Latvia supports U.S. implementation of sanctions related to Hizballah and has expressed a readiness to place national travel bans on individuals associated with Hizballah.

The continued announcements by countries in Europe, Latin America, and other regions of actions against the terrorist organization send a strong message to Hizballah and its backers in Iran that a new day is coming.  On this new day, Hizballah operatives will no longer be able to operate from European soil, and the European Union will follow the lead of a number of European governments by closing the loopholes opened up by the false distinction between Hizballah’s so-called military and political wings.

The simple fact is that Hizballah is a terrorist organization, root and branch.  The United States continues to call on all countries to take whatever action they can to prevent its operatives, recruiters, and financiers, from operating on their territories.

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    Broke. . . but Not No More: Opening Remarks--Innovation Policy and the Role of Standards, IP, and Antitrust
    [Read More…]
  • California Man Charged with Federal Hate Crime for Attempting to Stab Black Man
    In Crime News
    Assistant Attorney General Eric Dreiband for the Civil Rights Division, and U.S. Attorney David L. Anderson for the Northern District of California, and Special Agent in Charge Jack Bennett for the FBI San Francisco Division announced today that a California man has been charged with a federal hate crime for attacking a black man with a knife on a street in Santa Cruz, California.
    [Read More…]
  • U.S. Taxpayer in Panama Papers Investigation Sentenced to Prison
    In Crime News
    A former U.S. resident and taxpayer was sentenced in the Southern District of New York to four years in prison for wire fraud, tax fraud, money laundering, false statements, and other charges.
    [Read More…]
  • Briefing With Senior State Department Official On the New START
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Courthouse Closures for Hurricane Laura
    In U.S Courts
    Federal courthouses in Louisiana are closed due to the effects of Hurricane Laura.
    [Read More…]
  • Secretary Michael R. Pompeo And Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]
  • Judicial Conference Approves Measures to Increase Security for Federal Judges
    In U.S Courts
    A series of recommendations to upgrade and expand security for federal judges and increase Congressional funding to support the security program have been approved by the federal Judiciary’s national policy-making body.
    [Read More…]
  • Former DoD Employee Sentenced for Violently Assaulting Two Neighbors While Living Overseas
    In Crime News
    An Oklahoma City, Oklahoma man was sentenced today to 60 months in prison followed by three years of supervised release in the Western District of Oklahoma for assaulting two neighbors inside their apartment in Okinawa, Japan, while working for the U.S. Armed Forces overseas as a civilian engineer.
    [Read More…]
  • Jeffrey Lowe and Tiger King LLC Ordered to Relinquish Big Cat Cubs to United States for Placement in Suitable Facilities
    In Crime News
    On Jan. 15, 2021, a federal court issued a preliminary injunction in favor of the United States and against Jeffrey and Lauren Lowe, Greater Wynnewood Exotic Animal Park LLC, and Tiger King LLC based on claimed violations of the Endangered Species Act and the Animal Welfare Act.
    [Read More…]
  • Canadian Man Extradited from Spain to Face Charges for Massive Psychic Mail Fraud Scheme
    In Crime News
    A Canadian citizen accused of operating a decades-long psychic mail fraud scheme was extradited to the United States and made his initial appearance today in federal court in Central Islip, New York, the Department of Justice and the U.S. Postal Inspection Service announced.
    [Read More…]
  • Secretary Michael R. Pompeo Remarks to the Press
    In Human Health, Resources and Services
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]
  • Secretary Pompeo’s Meeting with the Taliban
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Georgia Man Sentenced to Prison for Running Ponzi Scheme
    In Crime News
    A Georgia man has been sentenced to 60 months in prison followed by three years of supervised release for running a Ponzi scheme that ensnared over a hundred victims, and induced college students and others to part with money for his own personal benefit.
    [Read More…]
  • Over 300 People Facing Federal Charges For Crimes Committed During Nationwide Demonstrations
    In Crime News
    The Department of Justice announced today that more than 300 individuals in 29 states and Washington, D.C., have been charged for crimes committed adjacent to or under the guise of peaceful demonstrations since the end of May.
    [Read More…]
  • Secretary Michael R. Pompeo With Hugh Hewitt of The Hugh Hewitt Show
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]