October 19, 2021

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DATA Act: Audit of GAO’s Fiscal Year 2020, Fourth Quarter, DATA Act Submission

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<div>Objectives This is a publication by GAO's Office of Inspector General (OIG). The OIG contracted with the independent certified public accounting firm of Williams Adley to audit GAO's compliance with the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act of 2014 (DATA Act), and produce this report. This report addresses (1) the accuracy, completeness, timeliness, and quality of GAO's Fiscal Year (FY) 2020, fourth quarter financial and award data submitted for publication on USASpending.gov and (2) GAO's implementation and use of the Government-wide financial data standards established by the OMB and the Department of Treasury, as required by the DATA Act of 2014. What OIG Found The audit found that GAO's data submitted for the fourth quarter of FY 2020 was accurate, complete, timely, of excellent quality, and in accordance with data standards. For more information, contact Tonya R. Ford at (202) 512-5748 or oig@gao.gov.</div>

Objectives

This is a publication by GAO’s Office of Inspector General (OIG). The OIG contracted with the independent certified public accounting firm of Williams Adley to audit GAO’s compliance with the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act of 2014 (DATA Act), and produce this report. This report addresses (1) the accuracy, completeness, timeliness, and quality of GAO’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2020, fourth quarter financial and award data submitted for publication on USASpending.gov and (2) GAO’s implementation and use of the Government-wide financial data standards established by the OMB and the Department of Treasury, as required by the DATA Act of 2014.

What OIG Found

The audit found that GAO’s data submitted for the fourth quarter of FY 2020 was accurate, complete, timely, of excellent quality, and in accordance with data standards.

For more information, contact Tonya R. Ford at (202) 512-5748 or oig@gao.gov.

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